about jer

Jeremy Clarke - portrait
Portrait (cc) Joi Ito.

Jeremy Clarke is a human web developer from Montreal. He loves his job building Global Voices and participating in open-source software like WordPress.

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Global Voices: The World is Talking, Are You Listening? Rising Voices - Helping the global population join the global conversation Global Voices Advocacy - Defending free speech online Threatened Voices - Tracking suppression of online free speech

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The easiest couple costume if you don’t mind being hit on by surprising people

Posted by jeremyclarke on November 2, 2013 · photos

For Halloween 2013 Sarah and I were going to go as our cats, but after being reminded about this great photo project with portraits of couples wearing each other’s clothes we decided to go as each other instead.

Animated gif of Jer and Sarah with their own clothes, then each other's clothes on.

SomaFM is great music to code to

Posted by jeremyclarke on August 24, 2012 · music
/**
 * @see http://somafm.com/
 */
if (is_playing('somafm', array('Beat Blender', 'Digitalis', 'Cliqhop')))
	$productivity++;

When it comes to musical accompaniment for coding or really any work that requires focus, I can never find anything better than SomaFM, a network of listener-supported internet radio stations. Many of them are low-lyrics or no-lyrics, and all are chill and contemplative in their different ways. Also no ads, just the occasional beg for donations.

In addition to the iTunes-compatible streams they also have apps for iOS and even Mac (I usually use the Mac one, though it’s got some bugs).

Some days I wonder why I don’t get anything done, other days I remember to turn on SomaFM. Here are my favorite stations (descriptions from the SomaFM site):

Drone Zone

Drone Zone: ambient commercial-free radio from SomaFM Served best chilled, safe with most medications. Atmospheric textures with minimal beats.

Digitalis

Digitalis: electronica/alternative commercial-free radio from SomaFM
Digitally affected analog rock to calm the agitated heart.

cliqhop idm

cliqhop idm: electronica commercial-free radio from SomaFM
Blips’n’beeps backed mostly w/beats. Intelligent Dance Music.

Beat Blender

Beat Blender: electronica commercial-free radio from SomaFM
A late night blend of deep-house and downtempo chill.

NetBeans Color Scheme: Solarized Dark with PHP Tweaks

Posted by jeremyclarke on August 17, 2012 · design · WordPress

Jump to download and installation instructions »

What is Solarized?

solarized logoSolarized is a programming color “palette” designed  by Ethan Schnoonover for use when writing syntax-highlited code. It’s based on color wheel and lightness relationships and it’s all sciencey and stuff, but the essence is that all the colors look good together and have good contrast, so you can use the different colors for different parts of your code (functions, variables, strings etc.) and no matter how you organize it the result should be easy on the eyes. It also has both a “dark” and “light” mode with different background/foreground colors, but most of the colors (red, green, magenta) work the same for both, which is cool.

Here’s a color reference I put together showing the various colors in Solarized Dark along with their RGB and hex codes. It was very useful to have around while working on the NetBeans theme (the Solarized site is strangely lacking a similar reference).

My Solarized Dark theme for NetBeans+PHP

As soon as I heard about Solarized I wanted to try it out with NetBeans, my IDE of choice for PHP/WordPress coding. I’ve spent many an hour tweaking my color schemes in NetBeans (and Smultron, my old text editor before that) and choosing the color relationships was always the hardest part, so having classy choices all laid out for me was very appealing.

The good news was that there is already a NetBeans port of the Solarized colors that worked as advertised. The problem was that IMHO it wasn’t particularly well executed. NetBeans has a lot of options in the color scheme settings, but they are also extremely confusing and often flat-out misleading, so I don’t blame the original author for not getting it perfect. He also may not have been looking at PHP code, in which case it makes sense that the PHP-specific color settings weren’t well organized. Lastly there’s a huge element of personal taste, even within the process of implementing a preset color theme like Solarized, so I recognize that the result is really just my personal opinion of what NetBeans+PHP+Solarized should look like.

All that said, here’s a screenshot of my NetBeans Solarized Dark theme:
Screenshot of my solarized dark theme for Netbeans

I like to think it balances the need to have different parts of the code be different colors and the limitations of doing so using the NetBeans color settings. It should work just as well with procedural and object-oriented code.

One feature I added that isn’t in the original Solarized for Netbeans colors is SVN support. I had to invent them, but my theme has appropriate red, green and blue background colors when viewing a SVN DIFF.

Installing my theme in your NetBeans

Since NetBeans has a configuration import/export system you can install these colors really easily.

  1. Download the .zip file linked below (don’t unzip it, NetBeans wants it as .zip).
  2. Open NetBeans and summon the Preferences window (Options on Windows).
  3. Go to the Fonts & Colors Preference tab.
  4. Click Import at the bottom of the window.
  5. Click Browse and find the .zip file, click OK.

Download netbeans-colors-solarized-dark-jer.zip »

Once you have the theme installed it should show up in the Fonts & Colors preferences as part of the Profile pulldown menu, where it’s identified as Netbeans_Solarized_Dark-jer.

Since I started using this I pretty much never feel the need to use a “light” theme so I haven’t tweaked the Solarized Light colors at all. Sorry if that’s what you would have preferred ;)

Anyway, hope some of you find this useful! I plan to someday get some of my changes added to the official GitHub repo, but wanted to get this out before my Code Faster and Smarter PHP with IDEs Like NetBeans talk tomorrow at WordCamp Montreal.

Video of my DRY CSS talk

Posted by jeremyclarke on March 7, 2012 · design · GlobalVoices

It’s not exactly a thrill ride, coming in at 51 minutes, but here’s the full audio+slides video of my presentation about DRY CSS, my “simple yet powerful CSS architecture that avoids duplication and increases design consistency by grouping shared properties together rather than redefining them over and over”. Sorry there’s not footage of my pretty face, I recorded this using Screen Capture in QuickTime and Voice Memos on my iPhone (using the earbud mic).

For the impatient, you can also go through just the slides on slideshare.

DRY CSS – Slides from my ConFoo 2012 talk

Posted by jeremyclarke on February 28, 2012 · design · GlobalVoices

Here’s the video with slides+audio of talk in case you prefer that. It’s 51min

This is an idea/talk that has literally been years in the making. Ever since I used this “DRY CSS” system for the Global Voices redesign I’ve been meaning to do the background research and lay it all out clearly like this. To me the core principle is so simple and standards-based that I have trouble believing it’s not already a thing, but I can’t find anyone else promoting it so here you go:

Embed should be above, here’s a direct link to the slideshare page: DRY CSS – A don’t-repeat-yourself methodology for creating efficient, unified and Scalable stylesheets »

Or if you prefer you can download the slides as a PDF »

Let me know what you think! Am I crazy? Why aren’t we already doing it this way?

A Love Poem in PHP

Posted by jeremyclarke on November 7, 2011 · General · WordPress

Wrote this a long time ago but never posted it. Stumbled onto it while cleaning up my email:

<?php
	$me = new Lover;

	$me->partner = $you;

	$me->feelings = array('adore','miss','want','love');

	foreach ($feelings as $feeling) {

		$me->express_feeling($feeling);

		if ($you->feeling_mutual($feeling))
			$me->epic_hugs($you);
	}
?>

Sure, it’s not the most expressive form of writing out there, but like with Haiku I think the limitation and challenge of putting poetry into code form can help push you to create something really fresh and strange without the baggage and cliché feel of regular poetry. I also just love naming variables and methods ;)

Either way, I think my poem is at least more uplifting than this other PHP love poem I found.

It was actually a follow-up to a shorter, twitter-length PHP love poem I wrote around the same time:

<?php
	$things_i_dont_miss_about_you = array();
?>

Submit your coded love poems in the comments, bonus points if it could at least theoretically execute in real life (assuming for example things like the existence of a “Lover” class with an express_feeling() method). If you’ve got the time write us an Epic PHP Poem, including all the needed class definitions :P

iOS apps worth considering

Posted by jeremyclarke on June 29, 2011 · General

A friend emailed a few people to ask for recommendations of what to install on her new iDevice. My reply was detailed enough I thought you might be interested too. Seasoned iOS experts will yawn at the list because a lot of these are commonly accepted good choices, but if you don’t spend time each day on apps you’ll probably find something you didn’t know about below.

Note: I’m too lazy to find links for them all. Open up iTunes and search and you should be able to find them pretty fast.

(more…)

Another year, another exciting WordCamp Montreal

Posted by jeremyclarke on June 22, 2011 · WordPress

Once again I’m organizing WordCamp Montréal along with a great team of co-organizers. I’m managing the schedule and helping with all the other stuff. We’ve got a lot of great talks lined up as well as some fun summer treats to keep everyone energized and make it a great social event on top of being a place to learn and grow your skills.

I'm going to WordCamp Montreal 2011!

Grab a badge for your blog here.

If you use WordPress and have been meaning to learn more about it you should definitely come. In three years I’ve literally never heard anyone complain that WordCamp is a waste of time, even when they find a million other things to complain about ;)

Tickets are on sale now, so you should register ASAP.

 

Richard Nixon on the failed Apollo 11 Moon Landing and Deaths of Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong

Posted by jeremyclarke on March 18, 2011 · General

The text below is a speech written for Richard Nixon in case something went wrong during Apollo 11, the first manned landing on the moon.

It assumes that the astronauts (Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin) are trapped on the moon and doomed to die. The American people know about it in real time and need guidance:

Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace.

These brave men, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for mankind in their sacrifice.

These two men are laying down their lives in mankind’s most noble goal: the search for truth and understanding.

They will be mourned by their families and friends; they will be mourned by their nation; they will be mourned by the people of the world; they will be mourned by a Mother Earth that dared send two of her sons into the unknown.

In their exploration, they stirred the people of the world to feel as one; in their sacrifice, they bind more tightly the brotherhood of man.

In ancient days, men looked at stars and saw their heroes in the constellations. In modern times, we do much the same, but our heroes are epic men of flesh and blood.

Others will follow, and surely find their way home. Man’s search will not be denied. But these men were the first, and they will remain the foremost in our hearts.

For every human being who looks up at the moon in the nights to come will know that there is some corner of another world that is forever mankind.

(Emphasis mine)

Obviously this is a beautiful and moving speech, and should have helped Americans understand this theoretical tragedy had it occurred, but what I love best is the careful avoidance of any mention of God or religious ideology.

The writer mentions ‘Mother earth’ and ‘fate’ but the overall feeling is clear: Mankind did this thing on our own, using our ambition, ingenuity and hope. Whether the mission is successful or not we had achieved something miraculous and unbelievable all on our own. We can take credit for the success just as we must face the blame if things go wrong. Either way we had re-invented our place in the universe for all eras to follow, and, most importantly, for the best possible reason: “the search for truth and understanding”.

Too bad the space race was as much about the cold war as it was about science, and that Nixon was a horrible person in the long run. For today his alternate-universe self will be my Atheist superhero. (The actual speechwriter was William Safire and not Nixon of course. Here is some audio of Safire talking about writing the worst-case scenario speech).

(Found in this amazing article by Robert Krulwich about the Soviet space program and it’s awfulness).

Raven: My Custom Theme (Templates) for Munin

Posted by jeremyclarke on February 19, 2011 · design · General

This post is about Munin and the custom theme I built for it, Raven.

Click here to skip to the download and installation instructions if you just want the theme »

Click here if “Load average” means nothing to you.

What is Munin and why am I bothering with it?

Munin is a program you install on servers to track their resource usage and application performance on a minute-by-minute basis and present you with graphs giving tons of detail about it’s status over time (each report can be viewed for daily, weekly, etc.) It has lots of core and community-built plugins to track different server applications and different aspects of a server’s health.

The basic idea is that you install a ‘node’ on each server you want to keep track of, then one ‘master’ that queries the nodes and generates the graphs for you. I’ve had it recommended to me by pro sysadmins a few times in the past but was intimidated by the complexity of installation and the inscrutability of the resulting graphs, which depend on you having pre-existing knowledge of the command-line tools who’s output they aggregate. Oh, my iostat is up… um… what do I do about that?

The best guide to understanding and installing Munin I found was this great set of articles on the Slicehost blog. They are intended for Slicehost customers, but seem to apply pretty well to anyone using the Linux distrubutions they cover.

The problem with Munin and it’s Theme ecosystem

So I got it running and am trying to figure out how to read the information it presents but there’s a problem: It’s woefully, sinfully and abysmally ugly. The web pages output by munin are not just composed on 90′s style tables, they are ugly tables, with tiny text and wasteful spacing.

It seems the sysadmin crowd just doesn’t care about these things, because even though there is a really easy system for modifying and restyling the underlying HTML and CSS there is only one alternate template available on the whole internet! You can find it here in the Munin docs but it is almost as ugly as the default and the way you install it is completely counterintuitive and under-explained. On the bright side it has some really useful javascript features that the default doesn’t, if you can get it to work that is.

FWIW I don’t even know how to refer to this. The files themselves are called ‘templates’ in various places on the Munin site, but IMHO the package as a whole should be called a “theme”, at least that’s how we do things in WordPress land. I tried to use both in this post so people find this post, but I’ll call it ‘theme’ from now on.

My Munin Theme: Raven

Screenshot of Raven theme

Screenshot of Raven. Click to enlarge. Compare with screenshot of alt-default theme.

My answer to this problem is a new theme based on the javascript-enabled alternative from the Munin site. I call it Raven because Munin is named after a Raven ally of Odin, Norse king of the gods. Essentially it’s just the default theme with 80% of the ugly removed and a grey and white facelift. There is still a lot of work that could be done to actually fix all the ugly-ass HTML, but I want to see if this gains any traction before putting in the time.

Features of Raven compared to the default theme:

  • Javascript-enabled so the various sections of the ‘overview’ page are in tabs at the top instead of one never-ending page. (this is the most important usability improvement)
  • Larger text all over to actually use up all the empty space created by the unavoidably-large graph images.
  • Reduced unneeded spacing and <hr> tags that just added noise.
  • Calm light-grey colors and rounded corners to soothe your mind while you toil over server performance.
  • Readme/installation instructions in the .zip file.

Download Raven theme

munin_templates_raven_0.1.zip

If I get good feedback about this I’ll post it on the official Munin Wiki, but for now you can grab the zip file above. Please take a look at the contents and read the README-INSTRUCTIONS.txt file before installing the theme.

Installation Instructions

The README-INSTRUCTIONS.txt file contains all the information you need to use Raven, including detailed instructions with background information about the locations you need to upload files to. Here is the summarized instructions so you can get a sense of how simple installation is:

  • Upload the “templates_raven” directory from this zip file into your Munin config directory (i.e. same directory that munin.conf is in, probably /etc/munin/)
  • Upload the ‘raven-htmldir-files’ directory from this zip file into your Munin HTML directory (where the public HTML is served from).
  • Edit your “munin.conf” file on the master and change the “tmpldir” property to reference the new “templates_raven” directory in your Munin config directory instead of the default “templates”.
  • Wait 5 minutes for the Munin master to refresh itself and reload.

Feedback? Thanks? Bugfixes?

Obviously this is my first attempt at a Munin theme and there is not a lot of other examples to emulate, so I may have done something horribly wrong. If you have questions or comments please use the comment form below to let me know about them.

I will try to get back to you ASAP but be warned: I am not going to support your Munin problems for you. I am sharing this theme to give back to the community, but if your problem is complicated I may not be able to help.

Thanks in advance to anyone brave enough to try out the theme and leave feedback!